Tech

Introducing SHIMANO GRX Mechanical 12-Speed Components

Supplied by Shimano

· By Press Office · 12 comments

In addition to the new 105 12-Speed groupset, SHIMANO have launched GRX Mechanical 12-Speed components. As our Events Calendar shows, gravel is here to stay. Check out the full press release here:

With the introduction of Shimano GRX RX820 12-speed mechanical components, Shimano continues its legacy of innovation as the originator of gravel-specific componentry. Rooted in simplicity, reliability, and adventure, the new 12-speed GRX lineup delivers more gearing options along with unrivaled ergonomics, so riders get the most out of each unpaved adventure, wherever that might be.

With a focus on the heart and soul of gravel cycling, Shimano mechanical GRX receives this 12-speed upgrade delivering top-tier performance without an over-the-top price. Since gravel is all about personal expression and freedom to choose how and where to ride, Shimano GRX includes three unique 12-speed mechanical drivetrain personalities to cover the full spectrum of riders and rides.

UNBEATABLE – SHIMANO GRX 1×12 with 10-45T

Riders who love pushing for personal bests or duking it out at the sharp end of a race, will appreciate the gear steps of the RX820 1×12 UNBEATABLE setup with a 10-45 cassette paired with a 40- or 42-tooth chainring. Like its 11-speed predecessor, RX820 delivers smooth, reliable shifting and now features a wider gear range and extra cog, making it easier to find the optimal cadence for maintaining your position in the pack.

This setup employs the RD-RX822-GS medium cage rear derailleur designed for use with the 10-45T cassette and includes Shimano’s integrated SHADOW RD+ chain stabilizer — providing quieter shifting and secure chain management in rough terrain.

FC-RX820-1 Crankset

  • 1×12-speed gearing
  • Crank arm lengths: 170mm, 172.5mm, 175mm
  • Chainring options: 40T, 42T
  • SHIMANO HOLLOWTECH II construction
  • 655 grams (172.5mm with 40T chainring)

RD-RX822-GS Rear Derailleur

  • SHIMANO SHADOW RD+ Chain Stabilization
  • Max cassette range: 45T
  • Interchangeable, replaceable GS/SGS derailleur cage – 290 grams

CS-M8100-12 Cassette

  • Freehub type: MICRO SPLINE – 10-45T range
  • 461 grams

UNSTOPPABLE – SHIMANO GRX 1×12 with 10-51T

For all-day—or multi-day—adventures heavy on climbing, the new RX820 1×12 UNSTOPPABLE option features Shimano’s wide-range, 10-51T cassette along with a 40- or 42-tooth chainring. This setup delivers optimal climbing gears for the steepest fire roads or high mountain ascents.


The UNSTOPPABLE 1×12-speed setup includes the RD-RX822-GSG long-cage rear derailleur with integrated SHADOW RD+ chain stabilizer that is optimized for use with the 10-51T cassette. New for this generation of GRX is the ability to change or replace the derailleur cage between 1×12 options. This means if you need to replace your cage or your gearing needs to change, you don’t have to buy a whole new derailleur. Additionally, Shimano brings its proven MICRO SPLINE mountain bike hub technology to gravel with both 1×12 mechanical GRX setups. This lightweight aluminum freehub design seamlessly integrates with 10- tooth top gears and features smaller, more widely spaced splines that limit cog damage over time.

RD-RX822-SGS Rear Derailleur

– 12-speed
– SHIMANO SHADOW RD+ Chain Stabilization
– Max cassette range: 51T
– Interchangeable, replaceable GS/SGS derailleur cage – 288 grams

FC-RX820-1 Crankset

– 1×12-speed gearing
– Crank arm lengths: 170 mm, 172.5 mm, 175 mm
– Chainring options: 40T, 42T
– SHIMANO HOLLOWTECH II construction – 655 grams (172.5 with 40T chainring)

CS-M8100-12 Cassette

– Freehub type: MICRO SPLINE – 10-51T
– 470 grams

UNDROPPABLE – SHIMANO GRX 2×12

This option delivers precise mechanical front and rear shifting and features integrated SHADOW RD+ chain stabilizer for ultimate drivetrain security over bumpy terrain. It maintains tighter rear cassette gear steps, ideal for subtle cadence changes during competitive racing and spirited weekend group rides. The 2×12 setup seamlessly interfaces with most existing 700c wheels thanks to its use of the tried- and-true HG freehub body design.

FC-RX820-2 Crankset

  • 2×12-speed gearing
  • Crank arm lengths: 170 mm, 172.5 mm, 175 mm – Chainring combination: 48-31T
  • SHIMANO HOLLOWTECH II construction
  • 721 grams (172.5 with 48/31T chainrings)

RD-RX820 Rear Derailleur

  • 12-speed
  • SHIMANO SHADOW RD+ Chain Stabilization – Max cassette range: 36T
  • 270 grams
    FD-RX820 Front Derailleur
  • 2×12-speed gearing
  • Toggle link construction offers more cable routing options – Wider tire clearance
  • Chainline +2.5mm vs. conventional road FD – Precise and easy adjustment with integrated cable tension adjustment
  • 95 grams

CS-R8100-12 and CS-HG710-12 Cassette

  • CS-R8100-12 range: 11-34T
    -345 grams
  • Freehub type: HG and HG L2 – CS-HG710-12 range: 11-36T
  • 391 grams
  • Freehub type: HG and HG L2

Updated Ergonomics and Brakes

GRX’s ergonomic distinctiveness continues with its redesigned shift/brake levers. Adding 12-speed shifting without any additional lever bulk, the RX820 series shifters are designed for all-day comfort when using flared drop bars–a gravel cycling staple. By reducing pressure points and increasing surface area, your hands will feel less fatigued, and you’ll be better in control as you test your limits.

The new GRX shift/brake levers offer light and responsive mechanical 12-speed shifting. While the left lever of the UNDROPPABLE 2×12 GRX group delivers Shimano’s unrivalled smooth front shifting, the new 1×12 groups carry over functions for the left lever first introduced with the original GRX: a brake lever- only model and a dropper-specific option that seamlessly integrates braking and dropper post actuation.

ST-RX820-R/L – Hydraulic Disc Brake DUAL CONTROL Lever

  • Gravel-specific brake lever and bracket ergonomics – Optimized for use with flared handlebar
  • Anti-slip coating on brake lever surface
  • Light and responsive mechanical shifting
  • 572.5 grams (2×12 ST pair) – 511.2 grams (1×12 ST pair)

ST-RX820-LA – Hydraulic Disc Brake and Dropper Lever

  • Left side brake and dropper post lever
  • Gravel-specific brake lever and bracket ergonomics
  • Optimized for use with flared handlebar
  • Anti-slip coating on brake lever surface
  • 263 grams

BL-RX820-L – Hydraulic Disc Brake Only

  • Left side brake lever
  • Gravel-specific brake lever and bracket ergonomics – Optimized for use with flared handlebar
  • Anti-slip coating on brake lever surface
  • 222 grams

SHIMANO GRX RX610

For the more budget conscious consumer and to allow a wider price range on complete gravel bikes, Shimano has also updated its 600-series cranks and shift levers for 1×12 and 2×12 setups that utilize trickle-down technology from the original 800 series GRX component line.
Top features include textured hoods and anti-slip brake lever coating that bolsters control on rugged terrain. The new cranksets offer gearing options that specifically cater to the demands of gravel riding. The RX610 2×12 crank features 46/30 chainrings and is available in 165 mm, 170 mm, 172.5 mm, and 175 mm crank arm lengths. The RX610 1×12 crank has the same four crank length options and is available with highly durable steel 38T (a new option) and 40T chainrings to pair with a 10-45T or 10-51T cassette. 

SHIMANO RX880 Carbon Gravel Wheels

Along with GRX mechanical components, Shimano is also introducing an updated carbon gravel wheel that’s purpose-built to handle the rough-and-tumble rigors of dirt road riding. The new RX880 wheelset is a full 64 grams lighter per pair than its predecessor and features the same shallow 32mm rim height for faster acceleration and quicker climbing. The RX880 wheels are tubeless-ready and employ a progressive 25 mm inner rim width that’s suitable for tyres from 32 mm to 50 mm wide.

User-friendly compatibility is further enhanced via a revamped DIRECT ENGAGEMENT hub design, borrowed from DURA-ACE wheels, that easily converts between MICRO SPLINE and HG L2 12-speed freehub bodies. It features quick and efficient engagement for rapid acceleration no matter what the riding surface. The RX880 hubs and rims are laced with 24 J-bend spokes front and rear that maximize strength and reliability no matter how adventurous your next ride gets.

WH-RX880-TL Carbon Tubeless Wheels

  • DIRECT ENGAGEMENT freehub – Rim height: 32mm
  • Internal width: 25mm
  • Full carbon rim
  • Recommended tire size: 32-50mm
  • Replaceable freehub body – switch between
    MICRO SPLINE and HG L2
    Note: Not compatible with 11-speed HG cassettes
  • 1394 grams (MICRO SPLINE) – 1397 grams (HG L2)

Stock is expected in December, with pricing TBC. For more product info check out road.shimano.com and get in touch with Coolheat for local queries.

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Comments

PappaWatTrap

Aug 31, 2023, 7:16 PM

I’ve always wanted to convert my hardtail into a gravel bike now I can hopefully just get the GRX shifters paired with my SLX 12 speed setup and some new handlebars. 

openmind

Sep 1, 2023, 7:52 AM

I get gravel, I've had a gravel bike since 2016 and I'm just as excited about this new groupset as anyone, but what really makes me sad about the whole gravel hype is the marketing like in this article that pretends that the people in the pics are having a good time when they are so clearly under-biked and would by any measure be better off on a mountain bike on the terrain that is showcased in the pics. Especially as many people depicted in the marketing images seem to be casual cyclists or new to the sport. I cannot imagine a better way to put someone off cycling forever than to put them on a gravel bike on what is obviously MTB terrain.
openmind

Sep 1, 2023, 7:56 AM

Not just talking about this article but gravel bike marketing in general. It's especially true in SA where our dirt roads are often cat 3 or 4 gravel and not the manicured smooth surfaces you'll find in the USA or the EU.
Jono

Sep 1, 2023, 8:07 AM

9 minutes ago, openmind said:

I get gravel, I've had a gravel bike since 2016 and I'm just as excited about this new groupset as anyone, but what really makes me sad about the whole gravel hype is the marketing like in this article that pretends that the people in the pics are having a good time when they are so clearly under-biked and would by any measure be better off on a mountain bike on the terrain that is showcased in the pics. Especially as many people depicted in the marketing images seem to be casual cyclists or new to the sport. I cannot imagine a better way to put someone off cycling forever than to put them on a gravel bike on what is obviously MTB terrain.

well that's one way to get me to click on the article 😄

The beauty of "gravel" is that it varies from tarred roads to single track where you question whether you should be walking or not. 

openmind

Sep 1, 2023, 8:27 AM

4 minutes ago, Jono said:

well that's one way to get me to click on the article 😄

The beauty of "gravel" is that it varies from tarred roads to single track where you question whether you should be walking or not. 

I would argue that the beauty of *cycling* is that "it varies from tarred roads to single track...". It's true that you could technically do all of that with a gravel bike but that does not make it a good idea. 

 

Nico van Loggerenberg

Sep 1, 2023, 9:17 AM

most roads in johannesburg are gravel roads. That's who it's for! 

The Ouzo

Sep 1, 2023, 9:29 AM

1 hour ago, openmind said:

I get gravel, I've had a gravel bike since 2016 and I'm just as excited about this new groupset as anyone, but what really makes me sad about the whole gravel hype is the marketing like in this article that pretends that the people in the pics are having a good time when they are so clearly under-biked and would by any measure be better off on a mountain bike on the terrain that is showcased in the pics. Especially as many people depicted in the marketing images seem to be casual cyclists or new to the sport. I cannot imagine a better way to put someone off cycling forever than to put them on a gravel bike on what is obviously MTB terrain.

yeah I agree, that terrain looks like it needs a full sus 120mm travel bike

babse

Sep 1, 2023, 9:38 AM

Our local constantia trail which the other day was smooth and gravel friendly as anything, is now a few seasons unmaintained and washed out rutted and rocky AF. I cringe seeing a few brave soles still attempt on gravel bikes literally hanging onto bars going snails pace. Man it looks unpleasant.

Dappere

Sep 1, 2023, 11:32 AM

3 hours ago, openmind said:

I get gravel, I've had a gravel bike since 2016 and I'm just as excited about this new groupset as anyone, but what really makes me sad about the whole gravel hype is the marketing like in this article that pretends that the people in the pics are having a good time when they are so clearly under-biked and would by any measure be better off on a mountain bike on the terrain that is showcased in the pics. Especially as many people depicted in the marketing images seem to be casual cyclists or new to the sport. I cannot imagine a better way to put someone off cycling forever than to put them on a gravel bike on what is obviously MTB terrain.

I understand what you're trying to convey, and in most cases, I'd also pick my MTB over any other bike. However, over recent times I've rather grown a close bond with my gravel bike - it's the one I choose when I want to rack up bigger kms with the potential for adventure. In my opinion, doing rides like the Cape Cross is perfect for a gravel bike, with its ton of mounting points and designed bags. I also appreciate the multiple hand positions a gravel bike offers over an MTB.

You're right though, you could certainly do all that on an MTB as well. For me, the efficiency not just in the bike itself, but in how it's able to carry bags and attach them with less hassle compared to working around a rear shock, makes the gravel bike ideal.

That said, I wouldn't attempt a true MTB-designed route on my gravel bike. There's certainly a time and place for both!

Cardio Goth

Sep 1, 2023, 8:33 PM

I ride quite a lot of gravel and have for a few years. I've done some relatively tough bikepacking, done a 200km gravel race, and various other 'gravel' things, all of which I've trained for on pavement, cobbles, gravel and MTB trails near my house.

I've ridden the same training routes and segments on everything from a light gravel setup (38mm Spez Pathfinder Pros on a Fairlight Secan) to a more rugged setup (42mm Spez Rhombus's on a Lauf True Grit) to a frankenstein setup (Rene Herse Fleecer Ridge 55mms on a 100mm travel hardtail) to a more traditional hardtail setup (Good Year Peak 2.4"s on the same hardtail). Some of the routes and segments are infinitely faster and/or more fun on a gravel bike, and some of which are faster and/or more fun on a hardtail. For gravel roads, I'd pick a gravel bike anyday - it will be faster. When things get chunkier, gravel bikes get slower (certainly for me, a not-particularly-skilled rider) and MTBs are more fun.

Tomorrow I'm doing an almost-completely gravel route with a friend who is fitter and faster than me. I'll be on my hardtail with the Rene Herse tyres which are pretty efficient on smooth gravel, and he'll be on a gravel bike. Even if I was as fit as him, I would *** off trying to keep up on everything except the few strategically-planned chunky descents and really steep climbs. It's just reality, but it doesn't make it any less fun. 

On topic.. It's nice to see Shimano finally not quite doing what SRAM did .. 5 years (?) ago. In 5 years time when this is electronic, it might be really awesome (spoken as someone who loves GRX Di2 2x)  

Baracuda

Sep 2, 2023, 5:27 AM

21 hours ago, openmind said:

I get gravel, I've had a gravel bike since 2016 and I'm just as excited about this new groupset as anyone, but what really makes me sad about the whole gravel hype is the marketing like in this article that pretends that the people in the pics are having a good time when they are so clearly under-biked and would by any measure be better off on a mountain bike on the terrain that is showcased in the pics. Especially as many people depicted in the marketing images seem to be casual cyclists or new to the sport. I cannot imagine a better way to put someone off cycling forever than to put them on a gravel bike on what is obviously MTB terrain.

Completely agree. Gravel bikes are good on gravel roads, mountain bikes are better on single track mountain trials. I really don't know why folks take gravel bikes on rooty single track and then say a mountain bike could be better. It is like doing a Tour de France stage on a MTB and then noting "these mountain bikes suck, a road bike would have been much better"

Danger Dassie

Sep 2, 2023, 9:52 AM

On 9/1/2023 at 9:52 AM, openmind said:

I get gravel, I've had a gravel bike since 2016 and I'm just as excited about this new groupset as anyone, but what really makes me sad about the whole gravel hype is the marketing like in this article that pretends that the people in the pics are having a good time when they are so clearly under-biked and would by any measure be better off on a mountain bike on the terrain that is showcased in the pics. Especially as many people depicted in the marketing images seem to be casual cyclists or new to the sport. I cannot imagine a better way to put someone off cycling forever than to put them on a gravel bike on what is obviously MTB terrain.

Must be looking at different images, every single image there is clearly a gravel environment.

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